Archive for July, 2018

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Announcement of New Board of Directors

Actsafe Safety Association is pleased to announce the appointment of Ted Violini as the new Chair and Dr. Roslyn Kunin as the new Vice-Chair of the Board of Directors.

Ted Violini

Chair, Board of Directors

ted violini headshot with decorative background

Ted Violini is the co-founder and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Theory+Practice, a Vancouver-based SaaS scale-up. Theory+Practice deploys ML and AI solutions that enable enterprises in the retail, finance, and insurance sectors to gain a deeper dynamic understanding of their customers. By establishing AI engines that continuously learn from customer interactions and improve over time, Theory+Practice helps brands get closer to their customers, anticipate their needs, and meaningfully serve them.

Ted specializes in people enablement and actively facilitates building people up to perform their best. With his philosophy of “people are the key to an organization’s success,” Ted brings a special type of care and support to his role as Theory+Practice’s COO.

Ted has over 20 years of executive operations and project management experience across diverse industries, including non-governmental organizations (NGOs), commercial construction, finance, and technology. This background has given him extensive experience in people enablement, human resources, contract management, corporate administration, security and compliance, and organizational finance. He has managed mission-critical projects with budgets ranging from $100K to $150M. He knows how to generate a return-on-effort by assembling and leading diverse teams to accomplish organizational goals with limited risk.

Ted has sat on multiple boards in the not-for-profit sector and appreciates the work he has been able to do in the NGO and charity sectors. A highlight of Ted’s career occurred during his role as General Manager at the Dalai Lama Center when he directed the effort of the Dalai Lama’s visit to Vancouver in 2014. Ted is passionate about the science of well-being and has a long experience being involved with workplace health and safety.

Dr. Roslyn kUNIN

Vice-Chair, Board of Directors

dr. roslyn kunin headshot with decorative background

Dr. Roslyn Kunin is one of those rare economists who can make the often-difficult subject of economics understandable and even interesting.

She was educated in Quebec and Ontario, finishing her studies with a Ph.D. in economics from the University of British Columbia (UBC). The University of Victoria has granted her the degree of Honorary Doctor of Laws. The Institute of Corporate Directors has granted her the ICD.D designation.

She has been awarded the Crystal Ball Award by the Association of Professional Economists, the Woman of Distinction Award by the YWCA and a Canada 125 medal for service to Canada and is a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of British Columbia.

Dr. Kunin was a director of the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research and is now on the council of Applied Sciences Technicians and Technologists of BC. She was Chair of the Haida Enterprise Corporation and has served the community in many positions including Chair of WorkSafeBC, Chair of the Vancouver Stock Exchange, Director of the Business Development Bank of Canada, Director of the Canada West Foundation, Governor of the University of British Columbia, Chair of the Vancouver Crisis Centre, member of the National Statistics Council and Vice-President of the YWCA. She has published numerous articles and books.

In her career, Dr. Kunin has worked in the private sector, written a weekly newspaper column, and taught at several Canadian universities including Simon Fraser University and UBC. She served twenty years as Regional Economist for the federal government in B.C. and Yukon and ten years as the Executive Director of the Laurier Institution. She is in private practice as a consulting economist.

group of friends outdoor in the sun

Harm Reduction Services at Summer Festivals

Summer is just around the corner, which means there will be summer festivals and events to look forward to. Bonnie Henry, the B.C. Provincial Health Officer, would like to take this opportunity to remind us all, including festival organizers, promoters, local governments, health authorities, and public safety officials about attending and organizing events safely in the context of a toxic illegal drug supply and ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Please read Bonnie Henry’s letter on Harm Reduction Services at Summer Festivals for more information. Fact sheets for major planned events are also available.

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New CEO Announcement

New CEO Announcement

March 2022

9 March 2022

The Board of Directors of Actsafe Safety Association is pleased to announce that Trina Pollard has been named as CEO of Actsafe Safety Association. Trina’s employment will commence in early April.

Most recently, Trina served as Manager, Occupational Health & Safety Consultation & Education Services at WorkSafeBC. Prior to that, Trina worked with go2HR as Manager, Business Development & Health & Safety Association & COR Certifying Partner Program. Trina has also worked in the fields of human resources management, non-profit management consulting and compensation & benefits consulting. Trina holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia as well as an Associate Certificate in Non-Profit Management from the BC Institute of Technology. Trina has had a long-standing commitment to the not-for-profit industry, particularly associations, and has served in a volunteer capacity on various Boards of Directors, committees and working groups for the past 20 years.

Trina brings to Actsafe a unique combination of business, regulatory and governance knowledge that we believe will help Actsafe navigate and serve its members’ interests as the entertainment industry evolves in a changing environment. We look forward to seeing, under her leadership, continued stakeholder and employee engagement in service of Actsafe’s mission of advancing health and safety in the production of motion pictures, television, live events and performing arts in British Columbia. Please join me in welcoming Trina to the Actsafe team.

Lynne Charbonneau 
Chair, Board of Directors 
Actsafe Safety Association 

9 March 2022

headshot of Trina Polard

The Board of Directors of Actsafe Safety Association is pleased to announce that Trina Pollard has been named as CEO of Actsafe Safety Association. Trina’s employment will commence in early April.

Most recently, Trina served as Manager, Occupational Health & Safety Consultation & Education Services at WorkSafeBC. Prior to that, Trina worked with go2HR as Manager, Business Development & Health & Safety Association & COR Certifying Partner Program. Trina has also worked in the fields of human resources management, non-profit management consulting and compensation & benefits consulting. Trina holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of British Columbia as well as an Associate Certificate in Non-Profit Management from the BC Institute of Technology. Trina has had a long-standing commitment to the not-for-profit industry, particularly associations, and has served in a volunteer capacity on various Boards of Directors, committees and working groups for the past 20 years.

Trina brings to Actsafe a unique combination of business, regulatory and governance knowledge that we believe will help Actsafe navigate and serve its members’ interests as the entertainment industry evolves in a changing environment. We look forward to seeing, under her leadership, continued stakeholder and employee engagement in service of Actsafe’s mission of advancing health and safety in the production of motion pictures, television, live events and performing arts in British Columbia. Please join me in welcoming Trina to the Actsafe team.

Lynne Charbonneau 
Chair, Board of Directors 
Actsafe Safety Association 

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Departure Announcement

Departure Announcement

December 2021

14 December 2021

After almost three years at the helm of Actsafe Safety Association, Manu Nellutla has announced that he will be resigning as CEO from Actsafe Safety Association effective January 7, 2022.  

During his tenure, Manu prioritized growth and innovation. The Actsafe team has doubled in size and has developed additional resources, training programs and safety advisory services such as ActONE (Actsafe’s Occupational health and safety Needs Evaluation). Manu led Actsafe in pivoting its operations to provide support to the industries during the COVID19 pandemic.  He has worked diligently to bring industry members together with a consensus-based approach on a range of safety initiatives. 

Manu leaves Actsafe with strong stakeholder engagement, a dedicated employee team and healthy finances. Actsafe remains well-positioned to further its mission of health and safety in the production of motion pictures, television, live events and performing arts in British Columbia. The Board will be initiating a search to identify a successor to build on this strong foundation and lead it forward.  

On behalf of Actsafe’s team and stakeholders, it is my pleasure to thank Manu for his leadership of Actsafe, and I wish Manu all the best in his future endeavours. 

Lynne Charbonneau 
Chair, Board of Directors 
Actsafe Safety Association 

14 December 2021

Manu Nellutla Actsafe CEOAfter almost three years at the helm of Actsafe Safety Association, Manu Nellutla has announced that he will be resigning as CEO from Actsafe Safety Association effective January 7, 2022.  

During his tenure, Manu prioritized growth and innovation. The Actsafe team has doubled in size and has developed additional resources, training programs and safety advisory services such as ActONE (Actsafe’s Occupational health and safety Needs Evaluation). Manu led Actsafe in pivoting its operations to provide support to the industries during the COVID19 pandemic.  He has worked diligently to bring industry members together with a consensus-based approach on a range of safety initiatives. 

Manu leaves Actsafe with strong stakeholder engagement, a dedicated employee team and healthy finances. Actsafe remains well-positioned to further its mission of health and safety in the production of motion pictures, television, live events and performing arts in British Columbia. The Board will be initiating a search to identify a successor to build on this strong foundation and lead it forward.  

On behalf of Actsafe’s team and stakeholders, it is my pleasure to thank Manu for his leadership of Actsafe, and I wish Manu all the best in his future endeavours. 

Lynne Charbonneau 
Chair, Board of Directors 
Actsafe Safety Association 

An Obituary for Maureen “Mo” Kaake

Actsafe has lost one of its stars with the passing of Maureen “Mo” Kaake on the 19th of June 2021. Our condolences and thoughts go to her husband Dave, her son and two daughters, her grandchildren, her dog Charlie, and all her family and friends.  

Mo joined Actsafe in 2005 when Actsafe was called SHAPE and had only 4 employees. Shortly afterwards, Mo became the backbone of our organization through multiple leadership changes and organizational growth and helped SHAPE Actsafe into the organization it is today. 

If you have ever used or are going to use Actsafe’s STAR learning management system, you can be thankful to Mo who led the development of the system for our industry. She was so passionate about making STAR one of the most accessible systems available and, as Mo had wished, this integral contribution to worker safety in our industry will be her legacy.  

If you’ve had any type of interaction with Actsafe, you will have come across Mo. Mo started with us as a receptionist and took upon various positions including office manager and finally her last role with us as operations manager. It is a rarity to have employees stay as long at an organization as Mo did and it comes with no surprise that Mo was a gem. We are glad that we had an opportunity to celebrate her 15th work anniversary with us in 2020.  

We have all known Mo as a warrior and fierce adversary of cancer. Even while struggling with her health issues, she ensured she continued working to support our team and our mission. To honour her fighting spirit, we at Actsafe are starting an annual bursary in the industry in her name that will support cancer survivors looking to access safety training. We will be releasing more details soon and we welcome everyone’s contribution to that bursary. 

You may all know that everyone at Actsafe was Mo’s second family. From the standing committees to the board, employer representatives to union friends, Mo would share her successes, challenges, and things she was passionate about. Our close-knit family in the office will miss the enthusiasm and energy with which she would engage everyone that walked through our door. We want to continue her legacy at Actsafe so that new team members can appreciate what she has done for us, and as such, we have re-named the committee room in our office as the ‘Maureen Kaake Room.’ A small token of love from all of us so that we all can remember her and send her our thoughts as we sit and meet in “Mo’s Room.” 

For us at Actsafe, our office and team will never be the same, but we can be proud to say that Mo worked with us all through this time. We will miss a friend, colleague, mentor, role model and inspiration.  

Mo’s Actsafe Family 

worksafebc building

WorkSafeBC COVID-19 Resources

Actsafe has curated a list of WorkSafeBC resources to guide employers through occupational health and safety during the COVID-19 pandemic. These resources can help ensure appropriate protocols are in place to protect workers and patrons.

Important: The Workplace Safety Order and Gatherings and Events Order expired on April 8, 2022. The Provincial Health Officer no longer requires that employers maintain a COVID-19 Safety Plan and can instead transition to communicable disease plans.

Visit WorkSafeBC to learn more about communicable diseases and how to prevent them in the workplace.
You may also download Actsafe’s Communicable Disease Plan template.

Mental Health in the Workplace

WorkSafeBC has released two new resources to help employers and workers navigate the mental health effects of COVID-19 in the workplace:

Face Shields and Barriers in the Workplace

Support for Employers

If you are an employer impacted by COVID-19, WorkSafeBC is providing additional support.

  • WorkSafeBC is waiving premiums for employers who are approved to receive the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) for furloughed workers (employees on leave with full or partial pay).

WorkSafeBC Resources

WorkSafeBC has released two new resources to help employers and workers navigate the mental health effects of COVID-19 in the workplace:

COVID-19 Health & Safety – Cleaning and Disinfecting resource here.

This new resource clarifies the use of face shields in the workplace, here.

Reviewing and Updating COVID-19 Safety Plans: A Guide for Employers. This guide was developed to walk employers through the process of reviewing and updating their COVID-19 Safety Plans, as required by the Nov 7 PHO order to FHA and VCHA employers, and asked of from all employers in the province by Dr. Henry in her press briefings.

Controlling Exposure – Assessing risk and controlling exposure – here.

Motion picture and television production: Protocols for returning to operation – here

Safety Plan App – find it here.

Performing Arts protocols for returning to operations – more details here.

WorkSafeBC deferring quarterly premium payments for an additional quarter – more details here.

COVID-19 Signage – occupancy limit, handwashing, reducing the risk of spreading the virus etc. posters from WorkSafeBC can be found here.

Additional support for employers impacted by COVID-19 – WorkSafeBC is waiving premiums for employers who are approved to receive the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) for furloughed workers (employees on leave with full or partial pay). Click here for further information.

Preventing exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace; a guide for employers – Orders from the provincial health officer (PHO) and guidance to employers and businesses provided by them BC Centre of Disease Control represent the minimum standard that employers must meet, to comply with obligations to ensure worker health and safety. This guide for employers provides questions you should ask to address health and safety concerns in the workplace raised by COVID-19.

Staying Safe At Work – Appropriate preventative measures should be in place for workers who continue to work during the COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak. Click here for WorkSafeBC’s workplace protections to consider.

COVID-19 and Q1 2020 payment deferrals for employers – Chris Back, Director of OHS Consultation & Education Services, WorkSafeBC released the following comminqué: COVID-19 and Q1 2020 payment deferrals for employers.

COVID-19 and returning to safe operation – Phase 2 – WorkSafeBC recognizes the importance of worker safety as businesses look to resume operations following COVID-19 related work stoppages or interruptions. The following materials provide employers with information and resources to assist them in ensuring the risk of exposure to the virus that causes COVID-19 is minimized at their workplace: worksafebc.com/en/about-us/covid-19-updates/covid-19-returning-safe-operation

BC Motion Picture Industry COVID-19 Pandemic Production Guide

The working groups formed by B.C’s Motion Picture Best Practices Coalition have completed the B.C. Motion Picture Industry COVID-19 Pandemic Production Guide. 

Developed by employers and workers in B.C.’s motion picture production industry, this comprehensive guide will provide the industry with the department and work area-specific information on best practices in returning to operations safely.

This is a dynamic document and updates will be made as more is known about this virus and how these guidelines need to be adjusted to help ensure worker safety.

Individual Guidelines:

Subscribe to our COVID-19 Resource Updates for the most current information.

You are not alone: My story

Mental health is still a difficult discussion. For those that suffer from mental health issues, there is still a stigma attached.

– Don Parman, Manager of Performing Arts Programs and Services, Actsafe Safety Association

My story. I don’t tell it to gain sympathy. I don’t tell it to make a political statement. I tell it to help open the door a little bit further for the next generation of live event technicians.

Most people have no idea that I have struggled with anxiety and depression since my early teens. In my case, it manifested itself as violent physical outbreaks. Thankfully, it was never directed at people but inanimate objects. Hitting, throwing, and breaking was the pressure release valve for anxiety and anger. Throughout my elementary years and into high school I struggled to keep friends and relationships because of my erratic reactions to often simple issues. There was little to no help within the school system in the ‘80s and ‘90s. What little was available was so limited that it never had any effect on my situation.

Skip to March 2, 1996, and while I was coming home from the wedding reception of a good friend, I was assaulted. Blindsided as I exited a 7-Eleven, they knocked me out by kicking my head into the curb outside the front doors as my girlfriend (now spouse of 23 years) watched helplessly from the taxi. No MRI. No follow-up. No counselling.

I was released the next day but the effects would linger for years.

Forward to 2003. Now married with two amazing kids, we realized it was time for help. While my colleagues rarely saw the outbursts, they continued at home. This had to change. Stacey and I embarked on a mission to get me help. This is where things get really interesting. Because I wasn’t a threat to myself, my family, or the public, I was thrown into a system that has no place for me.

Since then I have been on waitlists for over three years for subsidized treatment, only to get one session a month for a maximum of a year. We added to our mortgage to afford paid professional help. That help took six to eight months to find, only to have them decline my appointments because of my insane schedule.

When I finally had benefits through my employers, I was able to utilise the Employee Assistance Program’s counselling services, but again, they were designed for people that were a threat to themselves or others. I attended six sessions and was then referred to a waitlist for further treatment. I’m still looking for help today.

It’s not all bad news. Out of all these experiences, I have found tools that do help. My family being number one, but the general theatre community has been a major resource for me and I, in turn, hope that I can be a resource to the community.

The irony in all of this is that I write this during a pandemic lockdown which has given me a rare opportunity to truly work on my own mental wellness. I do not think I could have written this piece six weeks ago. Exercise, reduced work hours, and more time with my support system (Stacey, Kaleb, and Shelby) has me in a better mind space than I have been in in years which is interesting!

This article was written for our quarterly newsletter, Safety Scene. You can find a link to the full edition below.

Click here for the full Summer 2020 Edition of Safety Scene.

The Critical Importance of Psychologically Healthy & Safe Work Environments in the Era of COVID-19

COVID-19 has had significant impacts on every facet of our lives – and while we are working hard to ensure we are engaging in distancing and cleanliness to ensure physical health and safety, how many of us are tending to the psychological health impacts of COVID-19?

– Dr. Joti Samra, R. Psych, MyWorkplaceHealth

Preliminary data suggests that — just a few short months post announcement of the pandemic — rates of depression are doubling, anxiety quadrupling, and alcohol consumption is up 25%.

Furthermore, COVID-19 has had significant impacts on every single work environment — and by extension every worker, irrespective of sector or industry. The myriad impacts include uncertainty about job stability or future; layoffs (anticipated or feared); working fewer hours (or in some cases longer hours); and working from home — just to name a few. All of these changes have the ability to affect one’s mental health and are important to pay attention to, given that meaningful work and purpose is one of the most important contributors to our mental health.

For many, the fading distinction between our ‘personal’ vs. ‘work’ environments has contributed to an enhanced risk of burnout as one no longer provides a reprieve from the other. For example, an argument with a partner becomes difficult to escape as you no longer have the option to get some ‘time out’ by going to work; conversely, you may now be spending too much time thinking about work when you are home because your living area has turned into your work area.

Getting back to work

Since May, Canada has lessened isolation/quarantine measures, resulting in a return to pre-COVID work and life. Getting back to work can be both a blessing and a curse. For some, there may be excitement about getting back to a predictable routine. However, the majority (57%) of Canadians continue to be stressed out about leaving the house, and only 40% are comfortable going back to work.

For many people, this means finding the notion of going back to work incredibly confusing and anxiety-inducing. On one hand, people want to go back to the old normal where they could work, hug family and friends, or eat at a restaurant without worry. But on the other hand, people know the virus is still circulating, which brings anxiety about one’s own safety as well as the safety of others.

What employees and employers can do

In addition to ensuring physical distancing and hygiene/cleanliness protocols according to our leading health and government agencies, there are a number of things employees and employers can do to manage the stress associated with returning to work.

  1. Acknowledge and communicate that this is a stressful time.For employees who are anxious about returning to work, clearly and directly express your concerns to your employer (your direct supervisor or manager, or human resources). Know that as an employee, you have the right to a psychologically safe work environment. As an employer, make sure you prioritize psychological health and safety by speaking about it.
  2. Connect one-to-one and take the time to understand individual circumstances. Almost half of working Canadians have indicated their employer has not even asked them how COVID-19 has impacted them. Find out what unique situations and challenges employees are facing — including personal or family pre-existing health concerns, and parenting challenges and demands. Be flexible and adaptable where possible.
  3. Let people continue to work from home if this does not cause undue hardship. If employees are able to be effective at working from home and prefer to do so, let them continue until they are comfortable coming back.
  4. Offer more flexible work arrangements. To the degree possible, work around other demands employees are facing – including personal and childcare demands. This can build both trust and loyalty.
  5. Do regular beginning and end of shift check-ins. Ask your employees what they require to be and feel safe, and be open to input and feedback on changes you can make in the work environment.
  6. Disseminate information on psychological health and resilience to all employees. There are many free, high quality, evidence-based resources that exist – providing these to your entire workforce can be a cost-effective way to allow employees to self-select resources that would be helpful if they are struggling. MyWorkplaceHealth.com has many free resources for employees and employers alike, including free webinars, handouts, and worksheets.

Our resources include:

  • Our Psychological Health and Resilience toolkit contains a package of resources all oriented around enhancing your overall psychological health. Sign up for a free copy and join our community!
  • Please see our digital download page with access to many reading guides, worksheets and beyond.
  • We post blogs on our MyWorkplaceHealth site with relevant mental health in the workplace and psychological health and safety topics which you can access here and on our Dr. Joti Samra, R.Psych & Associates site on psychological health, wellness & resilience topics here.
  • We share videos on common mental health topics on our YouTube channel here including free webinars here.

This article was written for our quarterly newsletter, Safety Scene. You can find a link to the full edition below.

Click here for the full Summer 2020 Edition of Safety Scene.

Listen

When I was in high school, everyone joked that I was a great therapist. My friends would always come and talk to me about their problems. Siblings, relationships, assignments, no matter what, they turned to me to be their sounding board. To them I was known as “The Ear”.

– Anand Kanna, Manager of Motion Picture Programs and Services, Actsafe Safety Association

Most left our “sessions” feeling much better about their situations, with a clearer, rosier outlook on life. And it wasn’t because of anything I said. I offered no advice or amazing insight into their problems. After all, I didn’t have any more experience or knowledge than my friends, being a teenager in secondary school and all. So, what did I do that made people feel better?

Listen.

Whether it was in front of my locker, in the cafeteria at lunch, or on the drive home dropping off my friends, I just listened to them clear their minds or pour their hearts out, giving them an ear to talk their way through things. And it seemed to work. My friends were happier at the end of it, and life kept moving forward with my cohort surviving through graduation. And it continued through post-secondary. My best friend and I ended up at the same college, and we took classes scheduled in the evening. After that, we would hop in my car, and even though we lived a short drive away from the college, it would take more than an hour to get home. During that time, my friend would rant and rave about everything that bothered him while I drove. I didn’t say much, but I was still an active participant in the conversation, and I did what my friend needed me to do.

Listen.

But as time moved forward and life got busy, I seemed to be listening less. Time for my friends seemed to have vanished as home and work life started to encompass all.

Last year, I was lucky enough to attend a fabulous keynote presentation delivered by Stéphane Grenier. Stéphane is a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the Canadian military, and suffered from PTSD after several overseas missions, including the mission in Rwanda.

I took two things away from Stéphane’s presentation that made me believe we can all help, regardless of what experience in mental health counselling we have. The first one is peer support. As stated on the Mental Health Innovations website (https://mhic-cism.com) “Social support from a person with lived experience can inspire hope and empower others in similar situations”. So being there for each other with non-clinical support is an easy way to help people in their times of need. The second take away from Stéphane’s presentation is something we can all do.

Listen.

We have to take the time to listen to each other. Stéphane’s presentation a year ago re-kindled in me the importance of actively listening to my friends, family and colleagues, to help relieve the stresses in their lives. It may not cure everything, but most of the time people just want to be heard. They might not necessarily need answers at this time. Not every problem requires a solution right now. But by being there to lend an ear, provide a safe space for people to talk their way through their crises, and provide options for additional help, we have more power to help people work their way out of the darkness than we may have realized.

Listen.

It’s something that we don’t do often enough. But to someone in crisis, it could mean everything.

This article was written for our quarterly newsletter, Safety Scene. You can find a link to the full edition below.

Click here for the full Summer 2020 Edition of Safety Scene.

Psychological Safety At Work

Over the past few years, there has been much-required attention on the mental health of our nation, our communities, and – quite frankly – our industry. We’re now taking seriously how to take care of our own mental health and that of the people around us in our increasingly complex world. Systems are racing to catch up and we are only too happy to see a conscious broadening of the scope of Occupational Health and Safety to include Psychological Safety; it’s none too soon.

– Natasha Tony, founder and CEO of Elevate Inclusive Strategies

For the last two decades, I have been focused on Respectful Workplaces with a focus on justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion. As a labour relations specialist, my work was carved out of the myriad of injustices I have witnessed, that I have been asked to advocate and investigate and ameliorate. And now I educate.

We’re in the midst of a culture shift in our industry – which owes a great deal of gratitude to the courageous people who spoke up with the “MeToo” movement. We’re all far more conscious of privilege or, conversely, discrimination we see on the basis of gender identity, race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sexual orientation, and so on. They are locked into our laws, our safety regulations, our codes of conduct, employer policies, and collective agreements. It would be a good idea to be aware of what they say because the next step is making it real.

Whether or not there is intent, where there is impact there needs to be attention.

Those on the receiving end of intimidation, discrimination, sexual harassment, and bullying and harassment often hold feelings of anger and humiliation, an increased sense of vulnerability and a loss of confidence. There can be an inability to sleep, the onset of depression, and physical symptoms including headaches and body aches. Substance abuse, distress, anxiety, thoughts of suicide – these issues can become life-threatening if left unattended. Unresolved issues can be brought home, increasing family tension and stress and cause distractions that affect workplace productivity, and run the risk of creating workplace safety issues. We don’t want that for ourselves and we don’t want it for our colleagues. It’s got to be called out and it’s got to be stopped.

When we see something, we have to say something.

When I speak of organizational culture, I am referring to the philosophies, attitudes, beliefs, behaviours, and practices that define an organization. This culture can be toxic or what makes the organization inimitably successful. When we are talking about the culture shift of the entertainment industry, think about it as the workplace immune system.

What is in place to ensure that both our physical and psychological health is prioritized to maintain a healthy workplace?

Whether we are workers, supervisors or employers, we all have a responsibility to address injustice. That is, to educate ourselves in what injustice looks like, to be aware of our biases, and to question our own assumptions. And, although it’s hard, we need to be willing to listen when others are willing to speak about actions and attitudes that have a negative impact on them. It’s not always obvious to us. But we’re evolved enough to create space for different lived experiences, and to have empathy for issues that might not be our own.

There is the Golden Rule – which says that we need to treat people the way we want to be treated. When we talk about the culture shift and building a respectful entertainment industry, we are now talking about the Platinum Rule – which says we need to treat others in the way that they would like to be treated.

A respectful workplace is one that is free from discrimination, sexual harassment, bullying and harassment; a work environment in which all individuals are treated fairly and respectfully, have equal access to opportunities and resources and can contribute fully to the organization’s success. In healthy work environments, differences are acknowledged and valued, communication is open and civil, conflict is addressed early, and there is a culture of empowerment and cooperation.

When individuals are treated fairly and respectfully, stress levels are reduced, and the brain settles into a healthier rhythm.

As we move into a new normal, we could all use a little support and direction. Today’s Respectful Workplace training comes with an anti-discrimination lens. It doubles down on the responsibility of workers, supervisors, and employers to address and eradicate gender, racial, and all other forms of discrimination. It calls for awareness and understanding of the relevant Codes and employer policies and invites commitment to the creation of a culture that benefits the health and welfare of everyone working in the entertainment industry.

This article was written for our quarterly newsletter, Safety Scene. You can find a link to the full edition below.

Click here for the full Summer 2020 Edition of Safety Scene.

Motion Picture Industry COVID-19 Safety Guidelines

The Province of BC has announced we are in Phase 3, and welcomes all production activity to restart or begin.  BC’s motion picture safety guidance for return to production is now available on our here Motion Picture Industry COVID-19 Safety Guidelines.

Collaboratively developed by industry for industry to ensure a safe return to operations during COVID-19, these Safety Guidelines have been reviewed by WorkSafeBC and are subject to change.

Additional guidance specific to departmental operations are still being developed, and will be available soon.

Find our full offering of COVID-19 resources, including; posters, mental health resources, WorkSafeBC courses, and notices from the Ministry of Health, British Columbia, here.

WorkSafeBC announces additional support for employers impacted by COVID-19

Assessment payments under the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy program.

WorkSafeBC is waiving premiums for employers who are approved to receive the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (CEWS) for furloughed workers (employees on leave with full or partial pay).

WorkSafeBC recognizes the challenges employers are facing during this extraordinary time, and in light of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic will waive premiums on wages paid to furloughed workers of employers receiving CEWS subsidies. This change will be retroactive to the March 15, 2020 start date and continue for the duration of the CEWS program. Eligible employers will need to maintain documentation to identify workers that were furloughed as a result of this provincial health emergency.

This is the second measure WorkSafeBC has implemented to provide support for B.C.’s employers. Approximately 27,000 employers in the province have already opted to take advantage of the premium deferral measure implemented on March 27, 2020. Employers will not be charged a penalty or interest on first quarter premiums, up to the deferral date of June 30, 2020.

Waiving premiums for employers of furloughed workers will help support the rehiring of employees who may have already been laid off as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and will help better position employers who are considering reopening in the coming weeks. WorkSafeBC is committed to providing essential services to B.C.’s workers and employers and will continue to review support measures during this time.

Click here to view the announcement on WorkSafeBC’s website.

don and will background

What Would Don Do?

Join Don Parman, Actsafe’s Manager of Performing Arts Programs and Services, virtually to discuss any safety issues or concerns that the performing arts and live events industries are facing during these testing times. 
 
Have a health and safety question that you’d like answered? Ask Don!
 
Contact Don at donparman@actsafe.ca to get signed up.
 
Keep an eye on our social media platforms for upcoming dates. 
 
We look forward to seeing you and learning together!
 

You can find slides and resources from each WWDD here.

COVID-19 Impact; Updates and Resources

Course Cancellation & Coronavirus (COVID-19)

 At Actsafe, the health and safety of our course participants and the Actsafe team is of the utmost importance. As such, Actsafe has decided it best to cancel all inhouse classes scheduled up to and including April 30, 2020 to mitigate the impacts associated with the potential spread of the COVID-19 virus in our community. 

If you registered and paid for either the Occupational First Aid-Level 1 course or the Motion Picture Industry Orientation course, you have the option of getting a refund or keeping a credit on file for a future date.

If you are registered for the Motion Picture Safety 201 – Safety for Supervisors course, the Joint Health & Safety Committee Fundamentals course or the Reel Green Carbon Literacy course, there will be no charge to rebook into a future date.

 We apologize for any inconvenience these cancellations may cause.

Leavitt Machinery courses are going ahead as scheduled. However, if you are exhibiting the following symptoms, coughing, high fever, difficulty breathing, we ask that you do not go to class. Please let us know and we will rebook you into a later class at no additional charge.

Actsafe is following the situation and will provide updates when necessary. If you have any questions, feel free to email: info@actsafe.ca.

 Follow our Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn for updates.

Preventative Measures

We are all responsible for safeguarding ourselves and take every precautionary measure to remain uninfected with the virus. Proper hygiene can help reduce the risk of infection or spreading infection to others. Health Canada suggests:

  • wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after:

o   using the washroom and when preparing food

o   use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available

  • when coughing or sneezing:

o   cough or sneeze into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand

o   dispose of any tissues you have used as soon as possible in a lined waste basket and wash your hands afterwards

  • avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands

The world is grappling with an issue of enormous scale and human impact, and our hearts go out to all who have been affected by the outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19).

Mental Health

In light of the coronavirus pandemic, Actsafe reminds you that taking care of mental health is as important as looking after physical health. Coronavirus has thrust the world into uncertainty and this may be taking its toll on people’s mental health. For those who may be suffering from the stress of this situation, please remember that there are resources through Calltime: Mental Health that can help. We urge everyone to look out for one another during this time.

Actsafe Team Availability

Actsafe Safety Association is doing its part in mitigating the exposure and spread of COVID-19 to its team and community. Therefore, the Actsafe office is currently closed until further notice. However, the team are working remotely and continue to be available by phone, email, or LiveChat. Please reach out with any queries or concerns.

In the midst of COVID-19 we’ve curated a selection of resources we believe to be of value to our industries, which you may view here.

Actsafe’s Executive Director Steps Down

Geoff Teoli has accepted an exciting new position with the City of Vancouver so, unfortunately, this means that his last day with Actsafe will be October 5th, 2018.

Over the past five years Geoff has led Actsafe through significant innovation and growth, enhancing our organization’s delivery of services and support to the motion picture, television, performing arts and live event industries. He will leave a legacy of strong leadership, collaboration and passionate commitment to Actsafe’s health and safety mission.

We would like to take this opportunity on behalf of the Actsafe Team, Board of Directors, Standing Committees and our communities at large, to thank him for his support throughout his tenure with Actsafe. Please join us in wishing Geoff tremendous success in his future endeavours.

You can find Actsafe Safety Association’s Board Chair, Nancy Harwood’s, official announcement of this news here

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